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Online articles from back issues of Dragon Times
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Dragon Times From the Library Journal,
Spring, 2000.

“Dragon Times
is a journal for the serious martial arts enthusiast [its] newspaper format eschews gloss and trends to focus on the history and philosophy of martial arts. It is filled with in-depth, accurate articles about the many aspects of the martial arts Dragon Times relies on prominent instructors in the field to provide articles and information backed by expertise and knowledge. The publication will benefit most those who have a base knowledge of the martial arts. Re-
commended for any library where a serious interest exists." Michael Colford, MA.
Dragon Times is a periodical distributed by direct mail to subscribers and through the major book chains (Barnes & Noble, Borders Books & Music, Hastings Entertainment, Tower Books & Videos). Wholesale distribution in North America and Canada is by International Periodical Distributors (IPD) of Solano Beach, California. A subscription to four issues costs $10 including postage. While efforts are made to publish at quarterly intervals, greater emphasis is placed on quality of content than strict adherence to deadlines. Subscribers will however, always receive the full four copies.
Content
Includes:


articles on the history and development of the martial arts

• biographies of famous
masters

• technical and instructional articles

• product reviews

• schedule of traditional karate events

• editorial comment

• interviews of prominent martial arts personalities.

Click
here to read a sample article from issue #6.
Subscriptions
cost $10 for 4 issues,
$18 for
8 issues, and $23 for 12 issues including postage. Click here to subscribe.

A Special Dragon Times ONLINE Interview
Shinyu Gushi A Remarkable Exponent of the Uechi Ryu form of Karate.

Handing me his card rather formally, he said that he practised Ryokokaku karate and also taught kobudo. After a brief conversation in which we exchanged references, I realized that he had trained with many of the top Uechi Ryu teachers in Okinawa, and was therefore was in all probability a very talented karate instructor. His appearance was, however, puzzling to me. His hands and feet were so very small, and his body so slim and apparently delicate, one had to wonder just what his karate was like.
--
more

 

Suitable Swords for Iai and Test-Cutting
by Nakamura Taizaburo Batto Do Hanshi, 10th Dan (Translated by Guy H. Power.)

Keep in mind that there really is no standard size as swords should be tailored to the individual's body and personal likes. As a general rule-of-thumb, the correct sword length can be measured when standing naturally erect while grasping the sword's handle just below the tsuba, the hand held comfortably along the side of the leg. Allowing the sword to rest point down, the tip should barely touch ground a few inches in front of the foot. Fig. 1 illustrates the prime example of a sword used for iai batto do. -- more

 

Aikido and Competition
by David Alexander

A general perception of Aikido is that there are no competitions. This is largely true, although there are some styles which have limited competitions. Tomiki style, for example, has matches using tanken (short swords) with dull blades, and specific rules for scoring points. Also, some trainees like to test each other to see if they can make their techniques work against other trainees who are resisting with full power, and vice-versa. This is constructive in moderation since any weaknesses and defects in technique become immediately clear, as long as the primary goals of perfecting technique and developing cordial relationships with other trainees is maintained in the forefront. -- more

 

The Life Story of Karate Master Gogen Yamaguchi
by Graham Noble

Some readers may have seen a movie which came out a few years ago (1976), entitled "Way of the Sword." It was only a short film, a supporting feature, but it was about the traditional Japanese budo. Various martial arts were shown such as aikido, kendo, and kusarigama but the most intriguing part was the short section on karate, because this featured Gogen Yamaguchi, the headmaster of the Japan Karate-do Goju-kai (Goju Association).
Gogen Yamaguchi was shown sitting in front of a crystal ball. He performed various mudras (mystic hand movements) in the direction of the crystal ball, while doing special breathing exercises. He beat on a drum to summon up the spirits. According to the narration, Yamaguchi uses the crystal ball to communicate with the spirits of fighters past and future. They give him their secrets.
-- more

 

The Bubishi
by Harry Cook

In 1621 Mao Yuan I published a work on military tactics. Composed of 240 volumes, the Wu Pei Chih deals with all aspects of Chinese military tactics, and includes a section on empty hand methods. As I studied the history of the martial arts I was intrigued to learn that Chojun Miyagi had given the name "Goju Ryu" (Hard/Soft Style) to his art from a line contained in the Bubishi (Wu Pei Chih in Chinese). Determined to find out more, I looked at copies of Mao Yuan I's work in the libraries of Durham University and Cambridge University, but I could not find the section used by Miyagi. Finally after two years of looking, the truth finally dawned on me-there must be a different work with the same name! And of course, there is. -- more

 

Interview of Shinyu Gushi -
Uechi Ryu 9th Dan
Dragon Times Issue #14


Not many people find an 8th Dan karate instructor at the front door on a Sunday morning, especially not one carrying a large box of doughnuts. But then working at Dragon Times never was boring, and nor was this particular day as it started with a serious period while we checked his latest video, progressed to light hearted discussions over lunch, and turned into mirth and hilarity as the day drew to a close. Gushi sensei, every inch the stern karate master on the outside, has a well-developed sense of humor we discovered. Unfortunately, as is so often the case, I ended up being its target and as a result, the source of a great deal of amusement for my co-workers. At one stage while he was explaining a technique he made his hand into "hiraken" then grabbing my head without warning with his other claw-like appendage, rapped his knuckles on the side of my temple saying as he did so in a rather matter-of-fact way, "because this area (of my head) is very weak, you don't have to hit too hard!" -- more

 

Thoughts from Japan - The Order of Things
by David Hooper, Ph.D.

It struck me the other day that after so many years living in Japan, it is not the major cultural differences that fascinate people so much as the small, subtle, unexpected differences that creep up upon you. You adapt and make changes almost subconsciously to the point where some things that you do seem obvious and come as second nature to you, but are regarded as rather odd, or at least different, once you step back outside of Japan. What passes for normal behavior in a Western dojo may, on occasions, be regarded as quite unacceptable in Japan, and vice versa. Of course, I'm still a foreigner here in Japan, and always will be. No matter how long one stays in this country, or how proficient one becomes in the language, integration into Japanese society proceeds at a rate only slightly quicker than the rate at which lemon slices dissolve in tea. Nevertheless, to be involved in something as Japanese as JKA Shotokan Karate, one is inextricably bound up to a greater or lesser degree with Japanese culture, Japanese thinking and, at the very least, the strong, historical influences on Martial Arts that find their origins in Japan. -- more

 

Thoughts from Japan - By Way of Introduction...
by David Hooper, Ph.D.

Whenever I pick up a Martial Arts magazine and find an article or column about one or another aspect of karate, my first instinct is to skip straight to the end and find out who it is who is giving us the benefit of their insights and wisdom. Indeed, the first time I was asked to write something for a British publication (an article that I have to confess was considered somewhat controversial by the then karate establishment, and resulted in my subsequent expulsion from the association of which I was a member), the editor had the foresight to add a brief appendage, giving my "credentials." As it was, there were still a considerable number of subsequent inquiries as to who this Dave Hooper was (or thought he was), writing so critically about much of the karate in Great Britain, especially when numerous of his countrymen had already proved themselves formidable competitors at international level: a British team had previously won the World Championships, proving once and for all that the Japanese were not as invincible as everyone had once thought. "And anyway," some of them asked, "what's Dave Hooper ever won?" - as if this might have lent credence to the article, or at least helped me to justify my position. So, let me right at the outset lay my cards on the table, and give a little of the background which led to my involvement in karate, and in particular, training in Japan.
-- more


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Online Articles
Quick Links

Page 1

Interview of
Morio
Higaonna, 9th Dan, Hanshi, Goju Ryu
Dragon Times Issue #10

From the Ediror's Pen...
The John
Edwards Column, volume 16, Spring, 2000

In Defense of Mediocrity
The John Edwards Column volume 14, Summer, 1999

What the Olympics Will Bring to Karate
The Transformation of Karate

by Kiyoshi Yamazaki
volume 16, Spring, 2000

JKA Shotokan Karate Back to Basics
by
Dr. David Hooper

Essential Principles of Nakamura Ryu Iaido
by Nakamura Taizaburo with Capt. Guy H. Power

Constructive and Counter productive Use of Resistance in Aikido Training
by
David Alexander

Page 2

Yamanni Ryu -- Bo-Jutsu of Okinawa An Interview with Sensei Toshihiro Oshiro
by William H. Haff

Master Choki Motobu: A Real Fighter
by Graham Noble

Master Funakoshi's KARATE
by Graham Noble

Thoughts on Iaido
by Nakamura Taizaburo with Guy H. Power & Takako Funaya

Early Ju-jutsu: The Challenges by Graham Noble

The Soul of Karate-Do: Initial Move and Posture
by Masatoshi Nakayama, Japan Karate Association

Page 3

A Special Dragon Times ONLINE Interview
Shinyu Gushi A Remarkable Exponent of the Uechi Ryu form of Karate.

Suitable Swords for Iai and Test-Cutting  
by Nakamura Taizaburo Batto Do Hanshi, 10th Dan (Translated by Guy H. Power.)

Aikido and Competition
by
David Alexander

The Life Story of Karate Master Gogen Yamaguchi
by Graham Noble

The Bubishi
by Harry Cook

Interview of Shinyu Gushi - Uechi Ryu 9th Dan
Dragon Times Issue #14

Thoughts from Japan - The Order of Things
by David Hooper, Ph.D.

Thoughts from Japan - By Way of Introduction...
by David Hooper, Ph.D.

Page 4

The Fighting Tradition of Japan
by Akihiro Omi

Biography of
Osamu Ozawa
by
James Tawatao

Interview with Reverend Toshio Kuramoto
of the Hollywood Shorinji Kempo Dojo

Shorinji Kempo
by Richard Killion

Interview of
Rev. Yamamori
by Richard Killion - Dragon Times #15

The Karate of
Chotoku Kyan

Interview with the Seibukan's Zenpo Shimabukuro

Jujutsu&Karate
by Harry Cook

Page 5

Hawaii's first Nisei Karate Sensei
by Charles C. Goodin

Interview
Okazaki on Shotokan

The Sensei
by Harry Cook

Success in the martial arts
by Harry Cook

Chitose Tsuyoshi
A Bridge Through Time
by Michael Colling

Fighting Spirit
by Harry Cook

Karate Training
by Harry Cook

Page 6

Interview:
Liu Chang I

Interview With Eihachi Ota
of Matsubayashi Shorin Ryu

Roots
by Harry Cook

Secret Treasure of Okinawan Karate

Shindo Jinen Ryu
by Akio Omi

Interview: Shuichi Aragaki

 

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