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Online articles from back issues of Dragon Times
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The printed version of Dragon Times can be found in Barnes & Noble, Borders Books & music and other fine stores. Click here for a list of outlets. It contains the best written material on the authentic martial arts and is considered essential reading by all senior instructors.
Dragon Times is a periodical distributed by direct mail to subscribers and through the major book chains (Barnes & Noble, Borders Books & Music, Hastings Entertainment, Tower Books & Videos). Wholesale distribution in North America and Canada is by International Periodical Distributors (IPD) of Solano Beach, California. A subscription to four issues costs $10 including postage. While efforts are made to publish at quarterly intervals, greater emphasis is placed on quality of content than strict adherence to deadlines. Subscribers will however, always receive the full four copies.
Dojo Kun
by Harry Cook

One feature of training in a karate dojo in Japan which is not often met in the West is the practice of reciting the kun or code of ethics at the end of a training session. G. W. Nicol, in his book Moving Zen: Karate as a Way to Gentleness, refers to this practice and its place in Japanese karate-do: "The Oath was always chanted with strength, never mumbled in insincerity. Just as movements would become automatic and reflexes conditioned, the simple truths of the oath would also penetrate the mind of the participant. "The form of the dojo kun can vary from style to style or dojo to dojo, but in general the sentiments and basic ideas involved agree in most respects. My own experience centers on the kun used in Higaonna Sensei's Goju-ryu and Kanazawa Sensei's Shotokan dojos in Tokyo, where the five precepts were identical but not presented in the same order; this is also the dojo kun used by the Japan Karate Association. -- more

 

Yamanni Ryu -- Bo-Jutsu of Okinawa An Interview with Sensei Toshihiro Oshiro
by William H. Haff

All of the martial arts are rooted in the human experience, the human body. As one master said, "all martial arts comes from two arms, two legs, one head, one heart." But much of the history and background of martial arts today is shrouded in mystery. Because the training methods, techniques, and katas were passed down through verbal instruction and the old, almost secretive, face to face teaching methods, it is very hard for contemporary practitioners to know what is traditional, what has been changed, and what has been lost in the mists of time.

Yamanni-Chinen Ryu bojutsu provides modern martial artists a glimpse of an art that remains relatively unchanged by the passage of time and also a mirror or tool by which they can examine their own movement and their own style. Sensei Toshihiro Oshiro has brought this weapons style from Okinawa to the United States and wants to promote it throughout the martial arts community. This flowing and immensely powerful weapons style is a wonderful example of a traditional, sophisticated Okinawan martial art and can help show modern martial artists both how things were and how they are supposed to be. -- more

 

Master Choki Motobu: A Real Fighter
by Graham Noble

Posterity has not treated all the old karate masters equally. Some have had their praises sung many times in print while others, equally accomplished, have been all but forgotten. It would be nice to turn the spotlight onto some of these little known figures but so much karate history has been lost that it is often impossible.
Karate was introduced into Japan in the 1920's when several masters came from Okinawa to teach the art. The best known of these today are Gichin Funakoshi, who founded the Shotokan school; Chojun Miyagi (Goju style), and Kenwa Mabuni (Shito style). There were others however such as Kanken Toyama, Moden Yabiku, Kanbum Uechi; and Choki Motobu, who in many ways was the most interesting of them all. Unlike Funakoshi, Myagi and Mabuni, though, Choki Motobu did not leave behind him a major karate school. Perhaps he never organized his methods into a formal system, or maybe he was too much of an individualist.
-- more

 

Master Funakoshi's KARATE
by Graham Noble

Some Thoughts on Yoshitaka  There is a certain romance about Master Funakoshi's third son, Yoshitaka (or Giko). The stories of his training, his early death, and the excellence of his technique evident from old photographs, continue to exert their fascination. He is a favorite subject of mine, but trying to dig up details of his life is frustrating; for a variety of historical reasons he remains a neglected figure. The stories are that he began karate training as a child. Obviously he must have learned the art from his father, yet he somehow developed his own instinctive way of performing techniques; "dynamic" is the word that springs to mind. Photographs of past karate experts usually appear old fashioned, yet Yoshitaka's techniques look surprisingly modern. The development of his karate must have been given added impetus when his father passed on the major part of his teaching responsibilities in the 1930s.
-- more

 

Thoughts on Iaido
by Nakamura Taizaburo with Guy H. Power & Takako Funaya

I am not surprised that iaido has become remarkably spread and developed after World War II. Until the end of World War Two Japan's national identity was expressed through the Three Sacred Treasures--the mirror, the jewel, and the sword. The sword represents the spirit of the warrior to we Japanese; therefore, it is only natural to me that today there is an upsurge in the spirit of the Japanese Sword. This new popularity tells me that iaido has naturally spread among the Japanese. Before the war, not many people studied iaido even though they may have owned numerous swords. Those people had only owned swords simply because they were entitled to do so. In fact, kendo practicioners would say, "Studying iaido will prevent you from improving in kendo.' This attitude is attributed to the fact that iaido is composed mainly of kneeling techniques. In this sense, iaido has no relation to kendo, which contributed to iaido's not having been spread as widely as kendo in those days.
-- more

 

Early Ju-jutsu: The Challenges  
by Graham Noble

In the early years of this century Japan had emerged as a major world power, and victories over China in 1895, and Russia in 1904/5, aroused international admiration for "the plucky little Jap." In addition, the early propagators of jujutsu in this country were fortunate in that their efforts to launch the art coincided with a vogue for physical culture and professional wrestling. This was, in fact, the golden age of professional wrestling, a period which lasted from about 1898 to 1913 and the retirement of the then world champion Frank Gotch.


I suspect that there has always been an element of flim flam in professional wrestling, but in those early days this was held in check and the major matches involving such champions as Hackenschmidt, Zbysko, Gotch, Gama, and Padoubny were straight, genuine contests for a monetary prize. We can probably mark Gotch's retirement as the time when the entertainment aspect took over completely and John F. Gilbey (Author of "Secret Fighting Arts of the World", "Way of the Warrior" and Western Boxing and World Wrestling." --Editor.) is probably correct when he states that there hasn't been a straight pro wrestling match in America since 1915. The same would apply to Britain and Europe.
-- more

 

The Soul of Karate-Do: Initial Move and Posture
by Masatoshi Nakayama, Japan Karate Association

In the early days of karate-do, for some years after 1935 college karate clubs all over Japan held inter-school matches. They were called kokangeiko, 'exchange of courtesies practice' and the participants freely attacked each other with all the karate techniques at their disposal. Their original purpose was to promote friendship between clubs. The matches were to consist of displays of kata, the set patterns of defence and attack, or of practice in attack and counterattack. The latter was ideally a formalized affair. One person attacked, only once. Then his opponent counterattacked, again just once. They continued in strictly controlled alternation. But the young blood of the students ran too hot to be satisfied with such tameness. They could not resist the temptation to use to the fullest the techniques they had learned and the powers they had gained through daily training.
-- more


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Online Articles
Quick Links

Page 1

Interview of
Morio
Higaonna, 9th Dan, Hanshi, Goju Ryu
Dragon Times Issue #10

From the Ediror's Pen...
The John
Edwards Column, volume 16, Spring, 2000

In Defense of Mediocrity
The John Edwards Column volume 14, Summer, 1999

What the Olympics Will Bring to Karate
The Transformation of Karate

by Kiyoshi Yamazaki
volume 16, Spring, 2000

JKA Shotokan Karate Back to Basics
by
Dr. David Hooper

Essential Principles of Nakamura Ryu Iaido
by Nakamura Taizaburo with Capt. Guy H. Power

Constructive and Counter productive Use of Resistance in Aikido Training
by
David Alexander

Page 2

Yamanni Ryu -- Bo-Jutsu of Okinawa An Interview with Sensei Toshihiro Oshiro
by William H. Haff

Master Choki Motobu: A Real Fighter
by Graham Noble

Master Funakoshi's KARATE
by Graham Noble

Thoughts on Iaido
by Nakamura Taizaburo with Guy H. Power & Takako Funaya

Early Ju-jutsu: The Challenges by Graham Noble

The Soul of Karate-Do: Initial Move and Posture
by Masatoshi Nakayama, Japan Karate Association

Page 3

A Special Dragon Times ONLINE Interview
Shinyu Gushi A Remarkable Exponent of the Uechi Ryu form of Karate.

Suitable Swords for Iai and Test-Cutting  
by Nakamura Taizaburo Batto Do Hanshi, 10th Dan (Translated by Guy H. Power.)

Aikido and Competition
by
David Alexander

The Life Story of Karate Master Gogen Yamaguchi
by Graham Noble

The Bubishi
by Harry Cook

Interview of Shinyu Gushi - Uechi Ryu 9th Dan
Dragon Times Issue #14

Thoughts from Japan - The Order of Things
by David Hooper, Ph.D.

Thoughts from Japan - By Way of Introduction...
by David Hooper, Ph.D.

Page 4

The Fighting Tradition of Japan
by Akihiro Omi

Biography of
Osamu Ozawa
by
James Tawatao

Interview with Reverend Toshio Kuramoto
of the Hollywood Shorinji Kempo Dojo

Shorinji Kempo
by Richard Killion

Interview of
Rev. Yamamori
by Richard Killion - Dragon Times #15

The Karate of
Chotoku Kyan

Interview with the Seibukan's Zenpo Shimabukuro

Jujutsu&Karate
by Harry Cook

Page 5

Hawaii's first Nisei Karate Sensei
by Charles C. Goodin

Interview
Okazaki on Shotokan

The Sensei
by Harry Cook

Success in the martial arts
by Harry Cook

Chitose Tsuyoshi
A Bridge Through Time
by Michael Colling

Fighting Spirit
by Harry Cook

Karate Training
by Harry Cook

Page 6

Interview:
Liu Chang I

Interview With Eihachi Ota
of Matsubayashi Shorin Ryu

Roots
by Harry Cook

Secret Treasure of Okinawan Karate

Shindo Jinen Ryu
by Akio Omi

Interview: Shuichi Aragaki

 

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